History Detectives

Living History Day: Meet a Revolutionary War Reenactor

By Shana Fung

Come meet members of the Revolutionary War’s Third New Jersey Regiment this Memorial Day. The brigade will be stationed at the New-York Historical Society in full uniform ready to answer your questions and share their stories about life on and off the battlefield during the American Revolution. And if you’re a revolutionary history buff, don’t miss our special installation: Lafayette’s Return: The “Boy General,” the American Revolution, and the Hermione opening May 29.

To celebrate the Third NJ’s homecoming, we asked its commander Scott Barone to share his thoughts on being a historical reenactor.

Scott Barone and his son on the steps of the New-York Historical Society

Scott Barone and his son on the steps of the New-York Historical Society

How long have you been a historical reenactor?

I have been attending reenactments for years as a spectator but never thought about reenacting myself until 2005 when I read Private Yankee Doodle written by Joseph Plumb Martin. He was a 15-year-old from New Hampshire who lied about his age to join the Continental Army in 1775. Reading about his experiences really gave me an appreciation for what soldiers sacrificed. I wanted to pay homage to these brave souls. In 2006, at a reenactment in New Windsor, NY, I met a member of the Third NJ Regiment. He explained the fun he’d had raising his kids in the hobby. I had young twin boys at the time, and decided to enlist. Four years later, I’m now the regiment’s commander.

Who is your favorite historical figure?

My favorite historical figure is George Washington. I find him to be an amazing man for standing up to the world’s most powerful military with little hope for success. He was a true underdog. Although he had little formal education, Washington successfully turned a rag-tag group of men into a force to be reckoned with. As Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, Washington boosted morale and instilled his men with a resolute dedication to the revolution. These convictions propelled them to victory. Washington was also humble man and consciously retired from the presidency when he could have ruled indefinitely.

What advice would you give to a history buff interested in historical reenactment?

No matter what period of history interests you, there is most likely a reenactment group that portrays it. There is no better way to experience your favorite historical era than to “live” it. And the group you join usually becomes a second family. Being a reenactor has allowed me to travel to some amazing historical sites. It’s also a great feeling knowing that I am educating the public about the American Revolution, which is sadly an era many know little about.

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Little New-Yorkers: Cool Daddy Rat

By Neysela Da Silva-Reed

Recently, in Little New-Yorkers, we’ve been traveling the world exploring new countries that have influenced New York. This week, we’ll learn about a musical genre that has historic ties to this city: jazz! Come listen to scat and the amazing story Cool Daddy Rat this Tuesday, May 12 and Friday, May 15 at 3:30 pm.

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Cool Daddy Rat explores the relationship between a young boy rat, Little Rat, who wants to be as cool as his bass-playing father, Daddy Rat, and shows how talent is sometimes shared between family members. After the book reading, join us for a fun-filled craft workshop. Make your own jazz basses, just like the one played by Daddy Rat! Here’s how you can do it at home!

What you’ll need:

  • A bass template
  • A pair of scissors
  • Three pipe cleaners
  • Scotch tape
  • Crayons

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How to make it:

Step 1: Take the bass template and decorate it–get creative!

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Step 2: Select three pipe cleaners and make sure they’re straight

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Step 3: Place them in the center of your bass. Bend the bottom ends towards the back and tape them into place

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Step 4: Tape the top ends of the pipe cleaners to the front of your bass

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Step 5: Hide the tape with the tip of the bass template and you’re done!

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Here’s another funky bass made by a Little New-Yorkers:

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Meet the Fledglings this Mother’s Day!

By Rachel Walman

It’s spring and that means there are a lot of new moms in New York City…moms with feathers! This Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 10 we’re celebrating moms with and without feathers. Join us for our third annual Meet the Fledglings program. To celebrate the closing weekend of our stunning exhibition Audubon’s Aviary: The Final Flight, the Wild Bird Fund will bring baby birds to New-York Historical! Come join the flock! Families will touch and feed the baby birds, while learning about New York City’s avian life and the Wild Bird Fund’s efforts to preserve it. Click here to purchase your tickets for this fun, adorable program! To ensure the birds’ safety, children must be five or older. All attendees will receive a special Mother’s day pin button to show their love for bird and human moms alike. And be sure to check out photos from last year’s event.

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Part III: The History Behind The Pinkertonian Mystery

By Liz Stern

Earlier this week, I introduced Kate Warne, the Pinkerton National Detective Agency’s first female gumshoe. One of her most famous cases was the Baltimore Plot. The Pinkertonian Mystery, an interactive theater experience produced at the New-York Historical Society in conjunction with Live In Theater for families with kids ages eight and older. After receiving rave reviews, our first four shows have sold out. To keep up with demand we’ve added four new dates. Don’t miss out—buy your tickets here!

Nast, Thomas, “The Crowd at Baltimore Waiting for Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States,” The Illustrated London News, March 23, 1861, New-York Historical Society, Peters Collection.

In the early spring of 1861, the Civil War was about to erupt. The slave state of Maryland played a unique and critical role in this history. Opinions there were sharply divided between those who favored secession and those who opposed it, but very few people supported the recently-elected President Lincoln. In Baltimore, only 1,100 out of the 30,000 residents had voted for him. So it was to Baltimore where Pinkerton, a strong abolitionist himself traveled, along with his agent, Kate Warne.

They both went undercover. Kate became a Southern belle and began to frequent pro-slavery social gatherings in homes and places like the elite Barnum Hotel. She quickly “wormed” her way into Baltimore high society in order to learn locals’ secrets. It wasn’t long before she learned details of a plan to kill the president.

Lincoln had just set out on his journey from his home in Springfield, Illinois, to Washington, D.C., for his inauguration. He would travel by train, stopping along the way to make speeches, proclaiming his faith in the union of the country.

Pinkerton met with Lincoln in Philadelphia to tell him what he and Warne had uncovered in Baltimore. He advised him that it was not safe to travel through the city, because the journey would require a transfer between two train stations. Security would be too difficult to guarantee Lincoln’s safety.

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Pinkerton, Allan, “History and Evidence of the Passage of Abraham Lincoln, from Harrisburg, Pa., to Washington, D.C., on the 22d and 23d of February, 1861.,” New-York Historical Society.

Lincoln’s advisers did not believe Pinkerton and didn’t want Lincoln to appear cowardly by avoiding Baltimore. But Pinkerton was able to convince the president-elect of the danger and together they came up with a plan.

Lincoln would travel through Baltimore under cover of darkness the night before his scheduled arrival. Kate Warne booked a special private sleeper car and was able to escort Lincoln aboard as her “invalid brother” so nobody was aware of his presence. She and Pinkerton took turns throughout the overnight trip into Baltimore guarding the president-elect. Lincoln, with Pinkerton as his guard, successfully transferred in Baltimore to the second train and arrived in Washington, D.C., at six o’clock the next morning. That day, back in Baltimore, a mob with murderous intent greeted the scheduled train but there was no Lincoln aboard!

Allan Pinkerton compiled statements from many of the people involved in the derailment of the Baltimore Plot, including a statement from President Lincoln himself. Lincoln admitted he first disbelieved Pinkerton but when evidence of the assassination plot was confirmed by his friend and future Secretary of State, William Seward, it could not be ignored.

Lincoln was sworn in as president of the United States on March 4, 1861. Five weeks later, shots were fired at Fort Sumter and the American Civil War began. Pinkerton, at the request of President Lincoln and General George McClellan, became the head of the Union Intelligence Service. Check back here soon when we learn how his agents, including Warne, would serve in critical roles gathering military intelligence in the South.

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Part II: The History Behind The Pinkertonian Mystery

By Liz Stern

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Meet Kate Warne in The Pinkertonian Mystery, an interactive theater experience produced at the New-York Historical Society in conjunction with Live In Theater for families with kids ages eight and older. After receiving rave reviews, our first four shows have sold out. To keep up with demand we’ve added four new dates. Don’t miss out— buy your tickets here!

On April 14, 1865, 150 years ago this month, John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. Lincoln died the following morning. He was the first American president ever assassinated, launching the nation into shock and mourning. However, this was not the first attempt on his life.

Four years earlier, a plot to assassinate President-elect Lincoln was thwarted, in part by the detective skills of Allan Pinkerton and his loyal agents. It’s called the Baltimore Plot, and it’s a great story! Let’s first learn about one of the detectives involved.

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In my last blog post about the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, I introduced you to Mr. Pinkerton and the fortuitous establishment of his business in 1850. During the first decade of the agency, Pinkerton built his business by solving counterfeiting crimes, as well as providing security for trains and other businesses. He also hired some really great detectives.

One of those detectives was Kate Warne. Today, Kate is recognized as being one of the most important detectives in the agency, training and managing an all-female investigative staff.

But when Kate walked into the Chicago offices of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency in 1856, female detectives were unheard of. In fact, Pinkerton may have believed she was applying for the job of secretary. Kate, instead, had seen the job listing for detective and was there to apply for that position.

Pinkerton, Allan, The Spy of the Rebellion, G.W. Carleton & Co., 1883, New-York Historical Society.

Pinkerton, Allan, The Spy of the Rebellion, G.W. Carleton & Co., 1883, New-York Historical Society.

Although we do not have any images of Kate Warne, Pinkerton described her as a “slender, brown-haired woman, graceful in her movements and self-possessed. Her features…were decidedly of an intellectual cast…her face was honest, which would cause one in distress instinctively to select her as a confidante.”

According to Pinkerton, this was one of the most important qualities for a good detective. He wrote that detectives must “know the criminal in his weakest moment and force from him, through sympathy and confidence, the secret which devours him.”

When Kate told him that she would be able to “worm out secrets in many places to which it was impossible for male detectives to gain access,” Pinkerton hired her.

Kate served a long illustrious career with her mentor Allan Pinkerton. Stay tuned later this week when we continue to discuss her role in the Baltimore Plot, which changed the course of history.

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Remembering Lincoln’s Death 150 Years Later

By Rachel Walman

Tuesday, April 14, 2015, marks the 150th anniversary of the fatal shooting of President Abraham Lincoln, who died at 7:22 am the next morning. If you’re looking to pay your respects to “Father Abraham,” come to the New-York Historical Society this Saturday, April 11. Gilder Lehrman will be offering a rare look at Lincoln-related ephemera here at New-York Historical in a program called Up Close and Personal with Treasures from the Gilder Lehrman Collection. DCHM will be offering a Lincoln and the Civil War-themed family scavenger hunt.  And while you’re here, don’t miss out on our ongoing exhibition, Lincoln and the Jews through June 7. Kids can always meet the immortalized Lincoln himself in bronze outside our Central Park West entrance.

Mourners wore ribbons like these to show their grief for their lost leader.  On April 14, 2014, the statue of Lincoln outside our museum will also be wearing this ribbon. INV.5478

Mourners wore ribbons like these to show their grief for their lost leader. On April 14, 2014, the statue of Lincoln outside our museum will also be wearing this ribbon. INV.5478

Most of us know the story of Lincoln’s assassination. Stage actor John Wilkes Booth fatally wounded Lincoln at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., while he along with his wife Mary Todd, and friends Clara Harris and Henry Rahtbone watched the play Our American Cousin. The story ends with the capture and killing of both Booth and eight co-conspirators, two of whom also attacked Secretary of State William H. Seward on the same day. This reward poster for Booth and his compatriots was plastered across the country during the 12-day manhunt. It will be on display at Up Close and Personal this Saturday here at N-YHS.

While we often hear about how Lincoln’s death, we rarely hear about how he was mourned. It’s hard for us to comprehend what Lincoln’s assassination meant to the United States back in 1865. The day after his death, newspaper man James Gordon Bennett wrote an editorial in the New York Herald, declaring that it “has created a keener sorrow, a deeper, broader, more universal sense of the public loss, than, dare we say, has been experienced in any age, in any country, or by any people, over the death of one man.”

This profound sense of grief reverberated across the country in the weeks and months following April 15. Of course, some Confederates worried that by assassinating Lincoln, Booth had transformed Lincoln into a martyr, elevating his place in history. Yet, Myrta Lockhart Avery of Richmond, Virginia, captured a common southern sentiment when she wrote, “I heard some speak who thought it no more than just retribution upon Mr. Lincoln for the havoc he had wrought in our country. But even the few who spoke thus were horrified when details came…our reprobation of the crime…was none the less. Besides, we did not know what would happen to us.”

Dr. J.L. Burrows of the First Baptist Church in Richmond elaborated on the fear of northern retribution when he penned: “To hold a whole people responsible for an outrage which they not only disown, but deplore and abhor…cannot become a principle of action with fairminded and magnanimous men.” Southerners also feared the realities of Reconstruction under Lincoln’s successor, President Andrew Johnson.

African Americans had the most to fear from the loss of Lincoln. Frederick Douglass called his death “a great calamity” for people of African descent, who had hopes that the president’s second term and the conclusion of the war would result in increased civil rights.” Douglass mentioned in a speech that he saw a woman crying at the White House gates that her people had “lost our Moses.”

 

LEFT the public flocks to City Hall to view Lincoln’s body lying in state (photographer unknown, Lincoln’s Funeral, City Hall, New York City 1865, PR 065) RIGHT Lincoln’s casket was drawn through the streets to city hall on an ornate platform called a catafalque, pictured here (photographer unknown, Abraham Lincoln’s Catafalque, 1865, PR 065)

LEFT the public flocks to City Hall to view Lincoln’s body lying in state (photographer unknown, Lincoln’s Funeral, City Hall, New York City 1865, PR 065) RIGHT Lincoln’s casket was drawn through the streets to city hall on an ornate platform called a catafalque, pictured here (photographer unknown, Abraham Lincoln’s Catafalque, 1865, PR 065)

 

National mourning for Lincoln officially began on April 22 with his elaborate 1,662-mile funeral procession. Lincoln’s casket traveled the same path he took in life when campaigning for the presidency in 1860, visiting Philadelphia, New York, Cleveland, Chicago, and finally Springfield, Illinois, where he was buried. More than half a million people lined New York City streets to catch of glimpse of Lincoln’s casket on route to City Hall. And as many as 150,000 waited in line to view his casket over the course of the three days it remained there.

Unknown Broadside: [Lincoln assassination reward poster] s.l. 20 April 1865. Gilder Lehrman Collection, GLC04092

Unknown Broadside: [Lincoln assassination reward poster] s.l. 20 April 1865. Gilder Lehrman Collection, GLC04092

As you walk around your neighborhood in the days after April 14, imagine yourself doing the same 150 years ago. Imagine seeing black crepe, draped on buildings; flags with only 34 stars, also covered in bunting, stuck in windows or on lawns; and words of grief like these posted in front of one New York City home:

The tear that we shed,

Though in secret it rolls,

Shall long keep his memory

Green in our souls.

 

We hope you come remember Lincoln this weekend with us.

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Camp History: Colonial New York

By Shana Fung

This spring, Camp History campers at the New-York Historical Society explored the fascinating world of colonial New York by becoming historians and curating their very own pop-up exhibition! Campers had the once-in-a-lifetime experience of getting up close and personal with centuries-old artifacts from the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library and the opportunity to consult with reference librarians, research fellows, conservators, and curators while conducting their own in-depth research. They also had a ton a fun along the way. Check out some behind-the-scenes photos from Camp History below!

And don’t miss out on our upcoming session of Camp History! Between August 17 and 21, campers will learn about life in New York at the turn of the 20th century. Click here to sign up!

During the week, campers were given access to Museum spaces the public never gets to see…

During the week, campers were given access to Museum spaces the public never gets to see

 

They worked in a conservation lab…

They worked in a conservation lab.

 

They carefully handled rare documents.

They carefully handled rare documents.

 

They crushed blueberries to make berry ink.

They crushed blueberries to make berry ink.

 

They tried their hand at quill writing

They tried their hand at quill writing.

 

They met with a curator to see objects that are not on view.

They met with a curator to see objects that are not on view.

 

They did some serious work.

 

They made (and ate!) ice cream from a colonial recipe.

They made (and ate!) ice cream from a colonial recipe.

 

And they got silly with new friends!

And they got silly with new friends!

 

 

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Blast from the Past: Lincoln and the Jews

By Liz Stern

In Jerusalem, there is a beautiful street near the King David Hotel named for Abraham Lincoln. There is a similar one in Tel Aviv and a memorial statue of Lincoln in Ramat Gan. Why is there devotion in Israel to the 16th President of the United States?

Abraham Lincoln was a man with complicated religious beliefs. He did not grow up attending church and was even said to be critical of religious teachings. But as he matured and moved into a more public realm, Lincoln increasingly expressed himself using Biblical references. The deaths of his two sons and the painful reality of the Civil War further drove him to look to religion for solace and answers.

President Lincoln also respected the religious beliefs of others, most strikingly of the Jewish people. On March 20 the exhibition Lincoln and the Jews opens at the New-York Historical Society, taking an in-depth look at his relationship to and interactions with American Jews.

Photograph of Lincoln by Samuel Alschuler wearing Alschuler's velvet trimmed coat for this photo. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Photograph of Lincoln by Samuel Alschuler wearing Alschuler’s velvet
trimmed coat for this photo. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Visit the exhibition and meet Abraham Jonas, one of Abraham Lincoln’s early presidential bid supporters. This exhibition will include a letter from Jonas warning Lincoln of an assassination attempt before his first inauguration. More on this story in a future post when I delve further into the Pinkerton National Detective Agency!

Abraham Jonas to Abraham Lincoln, December 30, 1860. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Abraham Jonas had sons living in the South, from whom he learned rumors of a plot to kill Lincoln. The warnings did not go unheeded: Lincoln was smuggled into Washington, arriving safely in the dead of night ten days before the inauguration.

Abraham Jonas to Abraham Lincoln, December 30, 1860. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Abraham Jonas had sons living in the South, from whom he learned rumors of a plot to kill Lincoln. The warnings did not go unheeded: Lincoln was smuggled into Washington, arriving safely in the dead of night ten days before the inauguration.

In Lincoln and the Jews, you’ll also meet the interesting character Isachar Zacharie, an English-born chiropodist who healed Lincoln’s feet but also traveled behind enemy lines to seek peace with the Confederacy. He became Lincoln’s closest friend.

Carte-de-visite of Issachar Zacharie. The Shapell Manuscript Collection

Carte-de-visite of Issachar Zacharie. The Shapell Manuscript Collection

The president is credited with changing the law that required all military chaplains to be “regularly ordained ministers of some denomination,” removing the word “Christian” from the decree. Lincoln appointed Rabbi Jacob Frankel of Philadelphia as the nation’s first Jewish American Military Chaplain.

Possibly Abraham Lincoln’s most tangible legacy in American Jewish anti-discriminatory history is when he overruled General Ulysses S. Grant. On December 17, 1862, General Grant issued an order expelling all Jews from his territory, which covered the area between northern Mississippi to southern Illinois. It was called General Order No. 11 and it remains the only explicitly anti-Semitic official action of the U.S. government. Lincoln ordered its reversal two and a half weeks later saying he did not “like a class or nationality condemned on account of a few sinners.” The original document by Grant will be on view in Lincoln and the Jews.

As we mark the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Lincoln, it is fitting to look at his legacy with regard to Jewish Americans. He died, after all, in the middle of Passover, a time when Jews revisit the story of the Exodus from Egypt in search of freedom. At the end of the traditional Seder the words “next year in Jerusalem” are recited by all who celebrate.

“There is no place I so much desire to see as Jerusalem,” said President Lincoln to his wife Mary in the balcony of Ford’s Theater on April 14, 1865. These would be the last words he uttered, according to a family pastor who sat with Mary later. Perhaps he was inspired by Secretary of State Seward’s 1859 trip to Jerusalem? Perhaps the end of the Civil War was driving his interest in exploration? Lincoln was talking to his wife about their future—but he would never visit Jerusalem. Lincoln was shot in that balcony. In the wake of Lincoln’s death, synagogues across the country draped their altars in black and chanted prayers of mourning.

Moses did not reach Israel either.

Sources:

Holzer, Harold, Lincoln and the Jews, essay reprinted on Jewish Life in Mr. Lincoln’s City, jhsgw.org.

Mansfield, Stephen, “Lincoln’s Surprising Last Words: Excerpt from Lincoln’s Battle with God,” December 10, 2012, www.thenervousbreakdown.com.

 

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Reading into History: An Interview with Author of One Crazy Summer, Rita Williams-Garcia

By Rachel Walman

How did the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s affect Americans in different parts of the country? That’s the question we’ll tackle this Sunday, March 8 from 2–4pm during our Reading into History family book club meeting.

Photo courtesy of the author

Photo courtesy of the author

Join us here at the New-York Historical Society with author Rita Williams-Garcia to discuss her book, One Crazy Summer, the Reading into History family book club pick of the month. This decorated children’s book follows three sisters on a funny, poignant, and historical journey to visit their estranged mother in Oakland, California, in 1968. After discussion, we’ll all visit the exhibition Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen SomersteinThrough the book and the exhibition, we’ll compare and contrast Selma and Oakland, Dr. Martin Luther King and the Black Panthers, civil disobedience and armed action.

We’re exploring different aspects of the struggle for African Americans’ civil rights at a crucial moment. This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery marches—  historic, non-violent protests against policies and practices that kept African Americans from voting. The first day of the march, March 7, 1965, was later dubbed “Bloody Sunday” for the tragic turn it took. As 600 marchers approached  the Edmund Pettus Bridge, just six blocks from their starting point, all-white local and state police forces brutally attacked them with nightsticks and tear gas. After another symbolic march to the bridge two days later, President Lyndon B. Johnson sent in federal troops for protection, allowing the now 3,200 marchers to recommence their five-day, 54-mile journey on March 21, 1965. We’ll get to see images from the final day of the historic march currently on view.

LEFT marchers making their way from Selma to Montgomery, 1965. Photograph by Stephen Somerstein.  RIGHT Black Panthers at the Free Huey rally in Oakland, CA, August 25, 1968. Photo taken by Ruth-Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones for their photo essay “The Vanguard,” a copy of which is held in the N-YHS collection.

LEFT marchers making their way from Selma to Montgomery, 1965. Photograph by Stephen Somerstein. RIGHT Black Panthers at the Free Huey rally in Oakland, CA, August 25, 1968. Photo taken by Ruth-Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones for their photo essay “The Vanguard,” a copy of which is held in the N-YHS collection.

Before heading to the gallery, we’ll discuss the approach the Black Panther Party took to fighting for racial equality. The Black Panther Party’s principles conflicted with the non-violent, civil disobedience-focused activism of Martin Luther King, Jr., who was a leader of  Selma protest. They were a major force in California and across the U.S., were influenced by Socialism, and believed in armed self-defense. They garnered support by establishing community programs in cities across the country, including free breakfasts for youths in need, and also garnered a lot of criticism and sometimes violent resistance. If you know more, or want to, come share your thoughts at Sunday’s meeting!

We asked Rita Williams-Garcia to share her thoughts on her life and her book before we all get together. Read her wonderful words and join us for Sunday’s event.

What made you want to write One Crazy Summer?

I wrote One Crazy Summer because I wanted to share the times I lived through with my readers.  I didn’t attend a Black Panther summer program, but I did get a sickle cell anemia testing, courtesy of the Black Panthers and had a free breakfast or two as well. The Black Panthers were militant, but who would have thought they also served children in their communities? I found that interesting and wanted to share that through three characters I hoped would be memorable to readers.

 What were you like between the ages of 9 and 12?

I was part nerd, tomboy, and daydreamer.  I was that kid who couldn’t keep her hand down when the teacher asked a question.  I grew up on army bases and their surrounding towns where the great outdoors was a big part of an army brat’s life.  There was always dodge ball, baseball, kickball, tetherball, relay races, and so many other physical activities.  I played my heart out, and when I got tired I went off to daydream. I kept a diary and still have my very first lock and key diary. I was always reading and writing.

What is your favorite time period in American history? Why?

There was nothing like the 1960s! I knew I’d write about that period because I grew up during that time and remember so many historical events. It was a time of constant change.  I was in the first grade when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. I remember the Gemini space missions. Shortly after he returned from Vietnam, my father took us to Monterey Airport to hear Senator Robert F. Kennedy when he was campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination. I remember seeing the Black Panthers take center stage with their strong, militant talk. My mother even claimed to have been a Black Panther, although that wasn’t true! She was a Joan Baez loving hippie! The music of the 1960s is still good today.

What 3 words best describe One Crazy Summer?

Sisters, Mother, Power!

The Reading into History family book club is supported by a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this blog post and/or in Reading into History programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Learn the Chinese Art of Fan Dancing

By Shana Fung

As part of our ongoing exhibition Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion, we invite families to come learn a unique traditional Chinese art form: fan dancing. Through our learning series Ancient Chinese Arts Today, an expert here at the New-York Historical Society will teach the centuries-old dance style on March 15. Click here to learn more and sign up! 

In the meantime, check out some photos from our first two classes in the series: ribbon dancing and martial arts!

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