History Detectives

Author Archives: Rachel Walman

Martha Maxwell’s Menagerie: The Story of a Nineteenth Century Woman Naturalist

How many girls today dream of becoming scientists? In the twenty-first century, these girls can achieve their dreams far more easily than could girls in the nineteenth century. This Sunday, Reading into History book club families will learn about nineteenth century women in science by discussing The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly. In [...]

A Whale Bone Umbrella?! The Whaler’s Art of Scrimshaw

This Sunday, families who take part in our Lost Arts: Scrimshaw program will get to see examples of scrimshaw, an art form practiced by sailors on whaling expeditions in the nineteenth century.  Scrimshaw makers, called scrimshanders, most often made elaborate carvings into sperm whale teeth. Families will see examples of these and will carve their [...]

Reading into History: Interview with Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, Author of No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller

This Sunday, March 9, our family book club will meet to discuss No Crystal Stair by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, a book that looks at Lewis Michaux and the National Memorial African Bookstore. This bookstore was the intellectual heart of Harlem from roughly 1939 to 1975 and a favorite spot of such figures as Muhammad Ali and Malcolm [...]

The History of Chocolate at the New-York Historical Society

On President’s Day, Mars American Heritage Chocolate will take over two floors of the New-York Historical Society  to talk about the history of chocolate! They’ll be conducting demonstrations of 18th century chocolate-making and workshops about modern chocolate making, and visitors get to taste chocolate of the past and present. You might reasonably wonder: is there a difference? There certainly [...]

Carter G. Woodson and the Origins of African American History Month

The New-York Historical Society and the DiMenna Children’s History Museum celebrate African American history year-round, but we, and most other cultural institutions, pay special homage in February. Why? African American (or Black) History Month started with one man: a historian, author, and teacher named Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950). Dr. Woodson was the child of formerly [...]

History, Animated: The past comes to life in Camp History at N-YHS

Instead of spending your February break watching cartoons, why not learn how to make them? From 9am to 4pm, February 18-21, middle school students in New-York Historical Society’s Camp History program will create stop-motion animated videos based on the history they learn in the museum galleries. What do history and animation have to do with each other? Well, all [...]

Reading into History Author Interview: Cynthia Levinson on We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March

Young people have often played significant roles in history, often willing and able to take a stand when adults can’t or won’t. This month, when we celebrate Martin Luther King Jr’s life and legacy, the Reading into History Family Book Club is reading We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson, [...]

Reading into History: Interview with Martin Sandler

How did a few men and two giant herds of reindeer rescue hundreds of whalers trapped in Northern Alaska in the middle of winter in 1898? This Sunday, the Reading into History family book club will meet to discuss Martin Sandler’s book about this epic mission, The Impossible Rescue: The True Story of an Amazing [...]

Seasons of Light: How Animals Used to Light America

If you come to the New-York Historical Society this winter break you can go on the Seasons of Light scavenger hunt. This hunt celebrates the holiday season by exploring how America has been lit through the centuries. Our museum has so many artifacts related to light it was hard to choose what to put on [...]

Another Gettysburg Address

One hundred and fifty years ago today, thousands gathered in Gettysburg, PA for the dedication of a national cemetery for those who died at the Battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863. The three days of this battle left over 51,000 Union and Confederate soldiers dead, missing, captured, or wounded. The country needed to heal from [...]

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